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Federal Drug Scheduling

Are you in need of an attorney after an arrest on drug charges? Not sure where to turn?

Criminal defense lawyer Michael Anzalone can help.

In fact, at The Anzalone Law Firm in Nashua, New Hampshire, our legal team is waiting to help you get out of almost any bind.

One thing you’ll need to understand about drug cases is that you can be charged in either state or federal court depending on the circumstances. We can help in either court jurisdiction.

The federal government has placed drugs into five categories _ also called schedules _ which are determined depending on each drug’s acceptable medical use. The drug’s abuse potential is also taken into consideration.

Here’s the way it works. A Schedule 1 drug, for example, would have a high potential for abuse. The Controlled Substance Act lists the drugs and the it offers an overall primer of controlled substances. Your attorney will want to make sure you are familiar with this schedule.

What is the Schedule?

Schedule 1 includes drugs or substances that currently offer no accepted medical use. Officials consider these drugs to have a high potential for drug abuse. Examples of drugs classified as Schedule 1 drugs are: LSD, marijuana, heroin, ecstasy, methaqualone and peyote.

Schedule II drugs are chemicals or substances that are known for a high potential for abuse, or drugs that might lead to severe psychological or physical dependence. Examples of the drugs in this category include combination products with less than 15 milligrams of hydromorphone (Dilaudid); hydromorphone (Dilaudid), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Dexedrine, Adderall, and Ritalin.

Schedule III drugs are defined as drugs that have a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence. This category includes products containing less than 90 milligrams of codeine per dosage unit. Examples are Tylenol with codeine, ketamine, anabolic steroids and testosterone.

Schedule IV includes substances that are defined as drugs with a low potential for abuse and a low risk for dependence. These drugs include Xanax, Soma, Darvocet, Valium, Ativan, Talwin, Ambien and Tramadol.

Schedule V drugs have a lower potential for abuse and dependence than Schedule IV. These typically contain limited quantities of narcotics. Among those listed under Category V are cough syrups with less than 200 milligrams of codeine or per 100 milliliters, such as Robitussin AC, Lomotil, Motofen, Lyrica and Parepectolin.

Across New Hampshire, officials are concerned about the opioid crisis that has affected almost everyone in the state in one way or another. So law enforcement officers and prosecutors are taking a hard line on suspected drug abusers.

New Hampshire also takes a strong stance on illegal drug use. So, if you have been arrested on any kind of drug charge, the best advice is to have a trusted, experienced criminal defense lawyer on your side.

Michael Anzalone will tell you that you should never speak to the police before you’ve talked your case over with your attorney.

Please call today at 603-548-3797 for a free consultation with Michael Anzalone. We will be here for you 24/7.

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